The Millay Colony for the Arts is proud to announce the formation of an Advising Artists Council, made up of visual artists, writers, composers, critics, editors, publishers etc. This group is sharing their expertise and commitment to nurturing artists with us by advising us, particpating in our jury process and our events, and helping us to reach a diverse group of applicants for residencies. The Advising Artists Council is:

Advising Artists Council

Nick Brooke mixes musical sampling, lipsynching, and theater into a new genre. In his works, vocalists and actors are trained to mimic sampled collages of sound effects, pop songs, and musical ephemera, blurring the line between recording and live performance. His works have been performed across the U.S. and in Europe, and featured at the Spoleto Festival and the MATA Series. His work Tone Test was premiered at the Lincoln Center Festival in 2004. He has received awards and residencies from the Guggenheim Foundation, ASCAP, the Rockefeller Foundation, Djerassi, and the MacDowell Colony. Brooke's instrumental works have been performed by the Paul Dresher Ensemble, Speculum Musicae, Toronto's Continuum New Music, the Nash Ensemble of London, Orchestra 2001, Dan Druckman, and New York's Gamelan Son of Lion. During a two-year Shansi Fellowship to Central Java, he studied gamelan and collaborated on musical projects with Javanese composers, dancers, and visual artists. He holds degrees in music composition and philosophy from Oberlin, and a Ph.D from Princeton. He teaches at Bennington College.

Nicole EisenmanNicole Eisenman was born in Verdun, France in 1965 and educated at the Rhode Island School of Design. Her awards and honors include a John Simon Guggenheim Grant, a The Joan Mitchell Foundation Grant, and a Penny McCall Foundation Grant.

Her Solo Exhibitions include Cornell University Museum of Art, Ithaca, NY, the Shoshana Wayne Gallery Santa Monica, CA, the Jack Tilton Gallery, New York, the Noga Gallery, Tel Aviv, Israel the Entwistle Gallery, London, the Behavior, Rice University Art Gallery, Houston, TX, and the Shoshana Wayne Gallery, Santa Monica, CA. Group Exhibitions include "Retrospectacle: 25 years of Collecting Modern And Contemporary Art". 2003; Denver museum of Art, Denver, CO. curated by Dianne Vanderlip, 2002; "Back Room", Leo Koenig Gallery, New York, NY, 2002; The Lunatics Have Taken over the Asylum, Works On Paper, Inc. Los Angeles CA, 2002; and Super Natural Playground, Marella Arte Contemporanea, Milan Italy, 2002.

Pierre JorisPierre Joris left Luxembourg at nineteen & has since lived in the US, Great Britain, North Africa & France. In 1992 he returned to the Mid-Hudson valley where he teaches poetry & poetics at SUNY-Albany. He has published some 40 books of poetry, essays and translations. Forthcoming in 2008 are Aljibar II (poems, a bilingual edition with French translation by Eric Sarner, Editions PHI) and Justifying the Margins: Essays 1990-2006 (SALT Publishing). Pierre Joris' 2007 publications include the CD Routes, not Roots (with Munir Beken, oud; Mike Bisio, bass; Ben Chadabe, percussion; & Mitch Elrod, guitar) issued by Ta'wil Productions; Aljibar (poems w/ French translations by Eric Sarner, published in Luxembourg by Editions PHI) and Meditations on the Stations of Mansour Al-Hallaj 1-21 (Anchorite Press, Albany). Other recent books include Poasis: Selected Poems 1986-1999, and A Nomad Poetics (essays), both from Wesleyan University Press. Recent translations include Paul Celan: Selections, and Lightduress by Paul Celan, which received the 2005 PEN Poetry Translation Award. 4x1: Work by Tristan Tzara, Rainer Maria Rilke, Jean-Pierre Duprey & Habib Tengour translated by Pierre Joris came out in October 2002 from Inconundrum Press, and Basic Books published his co-translation (with Ann Reid) of Abdelwahab Meddeb's The Malady of Islam in 2003. With Jerome Rothenberg he edited Poems for the Millennium, vol. 1 & 2: The University of California Book of Modern & Postmodern Poetry. Green Integer published his 3 volumes of translations of Paul Celan: Breathturn, Threadsuns and Lightduress. Other translations include books by Abdelwahab Meddeb, Paul Celan, Maurice Blanchot, Edmond Jabès, Habib Tengour, Tchicaya U'Tamsi, Kurt Schwitters and Michel Bulteau into English, and by Carl Solomon, Jack Kerouac, Gregory Corso, Pete Townsend, Julian Beck and Sam Shepard into French.

Since 1967 he has been actively involved in little magazines: he published The Clown, a poetry magazine, at Bard College from 1967-1969; edited Corpus ("A Radical Newspaper of the Arts") in New York from 1969-1970; founded and co-edited (with William Prescott) SIXPACK (A magazine of contemporary literature) in London & New York from 1972-1977, was poetry editor for Paris Exiles magazine in Paris from 1985-1986. He has been a correspondent for PO&SIE, Paris (edited by Michel Deguy) since 1986; for Dédale, Paris (edited by Abdelwahab Meddeb) since 1995 and for Arapoetica, Paris (edited by Abdul Kader El Janabi) since 1999.

Timothy LiuTimothy Liu's books of poems are For Dust Thou Art: Poems (Southern Illinois Press, 2005); Of Thee I Sing (University of Georgia, 2004), selected as a 2004 Book-of-the-Year by Publishers Weekly; Hard Evidence (Talisman House, 2001); Say Goodnight (Copper Canyon, 1998); Burnt Offerings (Copper Canyon, 1995); and Vox Angelica (Alice James, 1992), winner of the 1992 Norma Farber First Book Award from the Poetry Society of America. His poetry has appeared in Bomb, Field, Iowa Review, Kenyon Review, The Nation, New American Writing, Ploughshares, Paris Review, Poetry, Slate, Virginia Quarterly Review and The Yale Review, among other publications. Reviews, articles, and essays of his have appeared in Art Papers, New Art Examiner, Publishers Weekly, and elsewhere. He edited the anthology, Word of Mouth: An Anthology of Gay American Poetry (Talisman, 2000), and his work has been featured in anthologies that include American Poetry: The Next Generation, The Best American Poetry, The New Young American Poets, Poets of the New Century, and many others. His poems have been translated into seven languages, and his journals and papers are archived in the Berg Collection at the New York Public Library. He took a B.A. from Brigham Young University and an M.A. from the University of Houston, and has taught at the University of California, Berkeley; the University of Michigan; the University of North Carolina, Wilmington; and presently teaches at William Paterson University. He lives in Manhattan.

Keith MayersonKeith Mayerson was educated at Brown University, BA, and the University of California, Irvine, MFA. His Solo Exhibitions include Kim Light / Lightbox, Los Angeles, CA, 2008; "Friends & Family", Shaheen Modern & Contemporary Art, Cleveland, OH, 2007; "Kings & Queens", Derek Eller Gallery, New York, 2006; "Heroes", Gallery Alain Noirhomme, Brussels, Belgium, 2006; "Rebel Angels at the End of the World", QED Gallery, Los Angeles, CA, 2005; "Hamlet 1999", Derek Eller Gallery, New York, NY, 2004; "Hamlet 1999, Pt. 3", Derek Eller Gallery, New York, NY, 2003; "Illuminations", The Fifth International, New York, NY, 2000; "Paintings and Drawings", Jay Gorney Modern Art, New York, NY, 1997; "Monty's Dream: The Sleeper in the Valley", Richard Telles Fine Art, Los Angeles, CA 1995; "The Marriage of Heaven and Hell!", Richard Telles Fine Art, Los Angeles, CA, 1994; and"Pinocchio the Big Fag", Kiki Gallery, San Francisco, CA, 1993.

Group Exhibitions include "Genesis I'm Sorry",Greene Naftali Gallery, New York, NY, 2007; "Joe Bradley, Ann Craven, Dana Frankfort, Keith Mayerson," Zach Feuer Gallery, New York, NY, 2007; "Likeness (Portraits from All Angles)", Geoffrey Young Gallery, Great Barrington, MA, 2006; "Summer Group Exhibition", Derek Eller Gallery, New York, NY, 2006; "How I Finally Accepted Fate", curated by Jason Murison, EFA Gallery, New York, NY, 2006; "This Name of This Show is Not GAY ART NOW", curated by Jack Pierson, Paul Kasmin Gallery, New York, NY, 2006; "Salon", Greene Naftali, New York, NY, 2006; "Inaugural Group Exhibition", Derek Eller Gallery, New York, NY, 2006; "The Most Splendid Apocalypse", curated by Jason Murison, PPOW Gallery, NY, 2005; "This Hard, Gem-Like Flame", curated by Joseph R. Wolin, Angstrom Gallery, Dallas, TX, 2005 and others.

He is co-author of Horror Hospital Unplugged, (with Dennis Cooper), 1996 JunoBooks/RESearch Publications, New York, N.Y. He curated NeoIntegrity at the Derek Eller Gallery, New York, NY in 2007. He is in the public collections of The Los Angeles Country Museum of Art, CA, The Museum of Modern Art, NY and The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, CA. He is on the faculty of New York University.

Chiori MiyagawaChiori Miyagawa has worked in the nonprofit theater field for more than ten years as a playwright and dramaturg. Her plays have been produced Off-Broadway, at renowned performance houses in NYC, and in regional festivals. Six of her plays have been published in different anthologies. She is a resident playwright of New Dramatists. She is currently working on I Have Been To Hiroshima Mon Amour for Voice&Vision and The Cave, a new adaptation of Antigone with director Rachel Dickstein for Ripe Time.

Miyagawa's other plays include: Comet Hunter, a play based on the life of the first woman astronomer, Caroline Herschel (Ensemble Studio Theatre/ Alfred Sloan Science and Technology Commission), America Dreaming (directed by Michael Mayer, music by Tan Dun, produced by Music-Theatre Group and Vineyard Theatre, published in Global Foreigners), Nothing Forever and Yesterday's Window (both at New York Theatre Workshop, directed by Karin Coonrod, Nothing at HERE by New Georges, Nothing published in Positive/Negative Women, Yesterday published in TAKE TEN), Woman Killer (Crossing Jamaica Avenue in co-production with HERE, published in Plays and Playwrights 2002), Leaving Eden (The Meadows School of the Arts, SMU Commission, directed by Greg Leaming); Awakening (Performance Space 122 in co-presentation by Dance Theater Workshop and Crossing Jamaica Avenue), Red Again/Antigone Project (Women's Project), Jamaica Avenue (New York International Fringe Festival, published in Tokens? The NYC Asian American Experiences on Stage), FireDance (Voice&Vision), Broken Morning (Dallas Theater Center and Crossing Jamaica Avenue at HERE), Antigone's Red (Virginia Tech, published in TAKE TEN II.)

Miyagawa's work has received support from many foundations and fellowships including McKnight Fellowship, Rockefeller Bellagio Residency, MacDowell Fellowship, Beinecke Playwright-in-Residence at Yale School of Drama, Rockefeller MAP grant (twice—for America Dreaming at Vineyard Theater with Music-Theatre Group, and for Nothing Forever at NYTW), Jerome Foundation, New York Foundation for the Arts Playwriting Fellowship, Van Lier Playwriting Fellowship, New York State Council for the Arts, TCG Extended Collaboration Grant, National Performance Network Suitcase Fund (twice), Asian Cultural Council Fellowship, Japan Foundation, Freeman Foundation, and others.

Prior to becoming a playwright, Miyagawa worked as a dramaturg for one summer at Sundance Theater Lab, as well as major theaters such as Arena Stage, Actors Theatre of Louisville, Berkeley Repertory Theatre, American Conservatory Theater, The Public Theater and Young Playwrights Festival. As a resident artist at Dance Theater Workshop, she produced two performance festivals, one with emerging artists of color (supported by The Greenwall Foundation) and the other with women solo performers (supported by New York State Council on the Arts). For Dance Theater Workshop's Public Imaginations Program, she conducted theater workshops for youth-at-risk at The Fortune Society and for survivors of domestic violence at The Sanctuary for Families. While she was Artistic Associate of New York Theatre Workshop, she managed the fellowship program for emerging artists of color for seven years. Currently she is the head of the undergraduate playwriting program at Bard College under the chair, JoAnne Akalaitis.

Sina NajafiSina Najafi is editor-in-chief of Cabinet magazine and the director of Cabinet Books. He is the editor of Letters from Mayhem (Cabinet Books), co-editor (with Sasha Archibald) of Presidential Doodles (Basic Books, fall 2006), and editorial director of Ilf and Petrov's American Road Trip (Cabinet Books and Princeton Architecture Press, fall 2006). Najafi has also curated several exhibitions, including "Philosophical Toys" (Apex Art, summer 2005), "Odd Lots: Revisiting Gordon Matta-Clark's Fake Estates" (White Columns and Queens Museum of Art, fall 2005; in collaboration with Jeffrey Kastner and Frances Richard), and the traveling exhibition "The Paper Sculpture Show" (traveling show: in collaboration with Matt Freedman and Mary Ceruti). He holds a B.A. from Princeton University, an M.A. from Columbia University, and an M.Phil. from New York University.

Tomás Urayoán NoelTomás Urayoán Noel is originally from San Juan, Puerto Rico. He is the author of Boringkén (Callejón/La Tertulia, 2008) and Kool Logic/La lógica kool (Bilingual Press), which was named a Book of the Year for 2006 by El Nuevo Día, Puerto Rico's leading newspaper. (The books are supplemented by a performance CD and DVD respectively, both featuring music by composer Monxo López.) His poetry has been published in various anthologies of Puerto Rican and Latino/a writing, and his articles, reviews, and translations of Latin(o/a) American poets have recently appeared in Centro Journal, Bomb, and Mandorla. He is co-founder and literary director of the South Bronx arts organization and collective Spanic Attack, with whom he has been performing since 2003. He currently divides his time between the Bronx and Albany, NY, and is Assistant Professor of English at the University at Albany, SUNY.

Frances RichardFrances Richard is a writer, editor, and educator. Her poems have appeared in journals including Conjunctions, The Boston Review, and The Brooklyn Rail; her book, See Through, was published by Four Way Books in 2003. As an art critic, Richard has contributed to magazines including Artforum, Bomb, and The London Review of Books, and to exhibition catalogues produced by institutions including the Guggenheim Museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art, Creative Time, Inc., and Independent Curators International.

Four Way Books and See Through were awarded a 2002 Greenwall Prize from the Academy of American Poets; other awards include the 2000 Marlboro Prize in poetry, chosen by Brenda Hillman, and fellowships at the MacDowell Colony, the Corporation of Yaddo, and the Djerassi Resident Artist Foundation. Richard is a member of the editorial team at Cabinet, a founding editor of the literary journal Fence, and teaches at Barnard College and the Rhode Island School of Design. In 2005 she curated and edited, with Jeffey Kastner and Sina Najafi, an exhibition and accompanying catalogue titled Odd Lots: Revisiting Gordon Matta-Clark's "Fake Estates." She lives in Brooklyn.

Jill SchoolmanJill Schoolman is the publisher and editor of Archipelago Books, a not-for-profit literary press based in Brooklyn. She founded Archipelago Books in 2003 after working with Seven Stories Press for four years in the editorial department. She graduated from Yale University with a BA in Literature in '92, and studied English literature at Oxford University in '89-'90. Her novel Down to the River was published by Philippe Hunt, Editeur in '97. She was selected to participate in editors' exchange programs in France, Germany, and Sweden. Archipelago Books is a non-profit press devoted to classic and contemporary international literature. Archipelago has published 27 titles to date and is supported by Lannan Foundation, NYSCA, the NEA, the International Institute of Modern Letters, among others.

Prageeta SharmaPrageeta Sharma runs the creative writing program at the University of Montana, Missoula. She is the author of Bliss to Fill (Subpress), The Opening Question (Fence Books), winner of the 2004 Fence Modern Poets Prize, and Infamous Landscapes (Fence Books). She lives in Missoula, MT.
 
 
 

Christopher StackhouseChristopher Stackhouse is a writer, curator, and visual artist. He has worked in several media and disciplines including film and video, music recording, theater, painting and drawing. He is the author of one published collection of poems, Slip (Corollary Press, 2005); and is co-author of a image-text collaboration with author/translator/professor John Keene, Seismosis (1913 press, 2006), which features Stackhouse's drawings in dialogue with Keene's texts. His visual art has been exhibited in galleries and exhibition spaces, including Wilmer Jennings Gallery (NYC) and White Box: The Annex (NYC). He is a Cave Canem Writer Fellow; a 2005 Fellow in Poetry, New York Foundation for the Arts, was a panel/juror for the 2007 Fellowship in Poetry, New York Foundation for the Arts, and a Bard College, Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts, MFA in Writing candidate, 2009. He will present a talk as a Visiting Artist to both writers and visual artists at The Lower Manhattan Cultural Council's 2007-2008 Workspace Artists-in-Residence program in March 2008. A forthcoming essay on form and experimentation in poetry will be published by the Academy of American Poets, in their print magazine American Poet, in the spring 2008 issue.

Lynne TillmanLynne Tillman is a novelist, short story writer, and critic. Her fifth novel, American Genius, A Comedy, was recently published by Soft Skull Press. Her other novels are Haunted Houses, Motion Sickness, Cast in Doubt, and No Lease on Life, a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award in fiction and a New York Times Notable Book of the Year. She has published three nonfiction books and three story collections, including, most recently, This Is Not It, stories and novellas written in response to the work of 22 contemporary artists. Tillman’s fiction has been included in many anthologies, including The New Gothic, New York Writes After 9/11, The Show I'll Never Forget, The Penguine Book of New York Stories, and Wild History. Her work has appeared in journals, such as Tin House, McSweeney’s, Black Clock, Bomb, Aperture, and Conjunctions, and her criticism has been published in Artforum, Frieze, Aperture, Nest, The Guardian, and The New York Times Arts and Leisure and the Times Book Review. Tillman is Professor/Writer-in-Residence at The University at Albany. In 2006 she was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship, and, in the same year, her papers were acquired by New York University’s Fales Library. She is the fiction editor of Fence magazine and is on the boards of Housing Works and The International Advisory Committee for the Wexner Prize.

Jennifer TsengJennifer Tseng is the author of The Man With My Face (AAWW 2005), winner of the Asian American Writers' Workshop's National Poetry Manuscript Competition and winner of a 2006 PEN American Beyond Margins Award. Her poetry and prose have appeared in journals such as Barrow St., Glimmer Train Stories, Indiana Review and Ploughshares. She is currently at work on a novel.
 

Rebecca WolffRebecca Wolff is the author of Manderley (University of Illinois Press, 2001), Figment (W.W. Norton, 2004), and the forthcoming The King (W. W. Norton, 2009). She is the founding editor and publisher of the literary journal Fence and of Fence Books, as well as of The Constant Critic, a monthly poetry-review website. Wolff is a fellow of the New York State Writers Institute, with which Fence is affiliated, and lives in Athens, New York.

Mark WunderlichMark Wunderlich is the author of Voluntary Servitude, (Graywolf Press, 2004) and The Anchorage, which received the 1999 Lambda Literary Award. He has received several fellowships, and his poems have been widely anthologized. He teaches literature and writing at Bennington College in Vermont, and is a member of the faculty of the graduate writing program at Columbia University.

Patricia YbarraPatricia Ybarra received her B.A. from Columbia University in 1994 and her Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities in Theatre History and Criticism in 2002. She is a Ford Foundation Minority Fellow and a founding member of the Latino/a Focus group of the Association for Theatre in Higher Education. Her recent and forthcoming publications include reviews, chapters, and articles in Text and Presentation, Gestos, Theatre Journal, The Encyclopedia of Modern Drama, and Theatre and Nationalism. Her area of specialization is theatre historiography of the Americas, with emphasis on the relationship between theatre, nationalism, and American identities in North America. She is currently writing her first manuscript, Performing Conquest: Theatre, History and Identity in Tlaxcala, Mexico 1538-2003.

She is an Assistant Professor of Theatre, Speech and Dance at Brown University. She is also a director, dramaturg and the former Managing Director of Richard Foreman's Ontological-Hysteric Theatre.

She lives in Providence, Rhode Island.

Monica YounMonica Youn was raised in Houston, Texas. A former Stegner Fellow, she has published poems in numerous journals and anthologies, including AGNI, Fence, and Poetry Review. She has one book, Barter, from Graywolf Press. She currently lives in Manhattan, where she is an entertainment lawyer.

Albin Zak is Chair of the Music Department at the University at Albany (SUNY). He holds degrees in composition and performance from the New England Conservatory and a Ph.D. in musicology from the City University of New York. His research specialties are popular music studies (especially post-1945 repertories) and the history of technology. He is the author of The Poetics of Rock: Cutting Tracks, Making Records (University of California Press), and editor of The Velvet Underground Companion: Four Decades of Commentary (Schirmer). He is currently working on a book entitled "I Don't Sound Like Nobody": Remaking Music in 1950s America (University of Michigan Press). He is active as a songwriter, performer, and record producer. His most recent album of songs is entitled An Average Day (Insatiable Records).